Tuesday, August 04, 2015

Friday, July 17, 2015

Towson Math Art Exibition

I am happy to be a part of this show at Towson University:




Newton's Third Law In Karmic Warfare



Detail of text


Detail part of mirror


Detail of eyes

We have all heard that what goes around comes around. In essence this is the contemporary western view of Karma. Yet, Karma has a long history in the east predicting that ones future events are influenced by one’s past events.

 Newtons third law of motion states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. ——— see any similarities? ——— The visual expression (above) titled “Newton’s third law in Karmic warfare” maps a karmic event into equal and opposite forces.

 The following LINK will take you to my paper on paradigm poems that will go into more detail of this piece. Here is an excerpt from the paper that discusses this piece:


Newton’s Third Law in Karmic Warfare 
In the poem “Newtons Third Law In Karmic Warfare” (Fig. 1,2) we map two dynamic forces against each other that always remain equal. Karma is a spiritual law that states that the current and future situation of a person is influenced by their actions of the past. So we are reminded of the vernacular version of Karma in the sense that “what goes around comes around”. I see Karma as the same archetypical concept as the conservation of momentum and energy. So in my expression we map the mass of the forces as egos. When we map our ego across the idea of mass we may get an idea of something that has inertia when moving or an entity that carries weight in certain situations. Some people are thought to have ‘massive egos’. We are also mapping the idea of acceleration across the idea removing or taking life — I am reminded that if I don't take care of my health I accelerate my own death. So acceleration is moving something through space and time. In physics it is a physical object however, in poetics It can be any object that makes sense to us. In this case we are objectifying life. So can I accelerate death in my enemies? What would be the mechanics of doing this? So can I view life as an object moving through time? These are questions that I would hope someone would ask themselves when looking at this poem. When looking at the visual metaphors in this piece one must notice that I am borrowing a mythological expression from Korean culture called a Karma Mirror. The creature stands upon a world of hellish judgment where we find upon its back a mirror that reflects our Karma back at us so that we may see it. I would hope you would ask what Kind of Karma has been created by the creation of nuclear weapons?

 Mappings 
 The following section of this paper is a list of metaphorical mappings that I have perceived by analyzing the aesthetic work titled “Newton’s Third Law in Karmic Warfare” (Figs. 1,2) The metaphor mapping nomenclature of Layoff and Nunez are used for this list.

 Metaphor from Physics: The Equation from Physics that describes equivalent forces IS Observations of equivalent forces 

Poetic Metaphors: Mirror IS Conservation of Momentum and Energy; Mirror IS Equivalence; Karma IS Equivalence; Karma IS Mirror

 Mathematical Poetic metaphors M1 or Mass (subscript 1) IS The Level Of My Self Righteousness; △v1 or The change in velocity (subscript 1) IS Me Taking Life From You; △t1 or The change in time (subscript 1) IS The Time It Takes For Me To Kill You; M2 or Mass (subscript 2) IS The Level Of Your Self Righteousness; △v2 or The change in velocity (subscript 2) IS Me Taking Life From You; △t2 or The change in time (subscript 2) IS The Time It Takes For You To Kill Me;

 Visual (image) Metaphors: Nuclear Proliferation IS Karmic Force; Karma IS Hell; Korean Karma Mirror IS a vehicle

Thursday, July 02, 2015

Winning


Here is a Orthogonal Space Poem titled "Winning"

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Thought For The Day


Science is the door on the perimeter of knowledge and wisdom is the wind that blows through that door. 

El Konde Kazimero

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

"Radius of Compassion" - A Sphere Poem


The sphere poem is where metaphorical content is mapped into an equation that describes aspect of a sphere.  The next image shows the equation for calculating the volume of a sphere. 





The sphere poem shown below titled "Radius of Compassion" utilizes the equation that describes the volume of a sphere.  Now the question posed to you is who in the world is described by this expression?



Friday, June 05, 2015

No Quarter / No Blame

Here is a new proportional poem inspired by my wife's description of clouds. The piece is titled: No Quarter / No Blame



Thursday, June 04, 2015

Time

Here is a new proportional poem that struck me while pondering time. In the vernacular it says Time is to Music as a Rollercoaster is to Space. OR Time is to a Rollercoaster as Music is to Space.  Yet I have to say I really like the sound of it just as it is on this screen. Time equals a Rollercoaster times Music all divided by Space.




Sunday, April 05, 2015

Friday, April 03, 2015

Rest In Peace - Bob Grumman 02-02-1941 / 04-03-2015

Bob Grumman on the right me on the left - @ Museum Of Modern Art - New York City - July 2010



 It is with deep sadness that I must report the passing of Bob Grumman. The world of mathematical poetry just got lonelier. I remember in the mid 1990’s getting an email from Bob expressing how happy he was to have found me, another mathematical poet who shared a similar vision to his. Furthermore I was happy to have learned of his existence as well. Until then I had thought that I was the only one doing it. I was happy to find out that others had some interest in it as well. First of all I have to say that other than myself, there is no other mathematical poet in the English language that has had as much passion for our brand of mathematical poetry. – Yes there have been others who dabbled here and there and made a handful of math poems – and I must mention Karl Kempton and Scott Helmes who have made serious contributions to mathematical visual poetry, but only Bob and I consistently expressed a passion for using mathematical equations as a structure for poetic expression. Bob seemed to be entertained by arguing with people about the validity of mathematical poetry BEING poetry. Personally, I have tried to avoid that particular argument and have been happy believing that mathematical poetry is its own genre and needs not to be called poetry. Yet it really makes no difference to me. I must also mention that while Bob and I both took ownership in this form of expression, we had many differences of opinion … sometimes our differences were painful and I felt as though I was stuck in the land of mathematical poetry (a deserted island) with a hard headed competitively driven egomaniac. It is true that in the past I have felt this way. - But now that the reality has hit that he is gone, I feel alone on this Island – and it saddens me. The worst part for the muse of mathematical poetry is that neither of us has inspired anyone else to do it. She had better find another one to do it - obviously neither Bob nor I have done a good job in spreading the word. (not that we haven’t tried) – It’s been over 200 years since the first mathematical poem that I know of was published and the genre lay dormant for all those years until the 1970’s before it sprouted up again. Bob has been integral in trying to keep mathematical poetry alive in this incarnation. He will truly be missed.

 Kaz Maslanka 04-03-2015

Monday, March 02, 2015

The Purpose of Art


This may very well be the most important thing I have done and probably the least visible.

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Koons

Here is a proportional poem by Kaz Maslanka pointing to the current state of affairs in the artworld.

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Friday, December 05, 2014

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

Addition

Here is a proportional poem by Kaz Maslanka that points to the mechanics of commerce.

How Algorithms Shape Our World

Here is an interesting talk on the language of math getting out of control and having a mind of its own:

 Click Here

Well kind of having a mind of its own ;)

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